YEAR

CRIMINAL LAW

AUTHOR SOURCE SELECT ABSTRACT
2009 A forensic approach for the anabolic-androgenic steroid use in the mitigation of criminal behavior George Glass MD psychiatry journal 6221 The use of anabolic steroids to enhance sports performance has been recognized for many years. The positive effect of these agents on the muscle development and physical endurance of professional athletes has been widely publicized, but these substances also have many negative side effects. They can cause individuals to become moody, aggressive, self-centered, and irritable, to the extent that their personalities are altered. This article re-views some of the negative effects of anabolic steroids, particularly as they relate to mental status and behavior such that a normal individual who uses these substances would even commit a crime. Three cases are reviewed in which the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids was associated with crimes after the individual s behavior was noted to be aberrant, and ego-dystonic. These individuals were historically not sociopaths, their criminal behavior was unexpected, and was described as out of character by their family and friends. Their use of these agents on a regular basis coincided with dramatic personality changes. Strikingly, their personalities reverted back to their premorbid style after they were off steroids, despite the associated stress of their legal situations. In each case, the attorneys used the indi-vidual s steroid use to explain what happened, and then focused on it in an effort to mitigate sentencing. It is hoped that the information provided about the effects of anabolic steroids, combined with the case histories presented, will help others as they deal with similar situations.
2009 Assessing adaptive behavior of criminal defendants in capital cases-a reconsiderations Keith Widaman PhD
Gary Siperstein PhD
psychology journal 9019 A key aspect of the diagnosis of mental retardation, particularly for defendants in Atkins cases, is the assessment of deficits in adaptive behavior. Recently, Denkowski and Denkowski proposed a comprehensive model for the assessment and evaluation of adaptive behavior of such defendants. This comprehensive model has many aspects that are inconsistent with accepted professional standards for the administration and scoring of psychological measurements. We discuss what we see as the major problems with the comprehensive model, citing research literature that conflicts with their recommendations. We close by offering suggestions regarding how adaptive behavior deficits might optimally be assessed.
2009 Fundamentals-what criminal defense lawyers expect from a forensic psychiatrist John Philipsborn MEd, JD Psychiatry CD 10563 Forensic psychiatrists and criminal defense lawyers working together have expectations of one another. The presenter will review what expectations experienced criminal defense lawyers have of their experts in forensic psychiatry, including familiarity with relevant legal standards, knowledge of current literature, and familiarity with the differences between legal and clinical definitions. Attendees will be able to describe what literature, basic information, and standards they should be conversant in when taking on criminal case assignments. John T. Philipsborn is a criminal dfense lawyer in San Francisco. He has figured in more than 70 reported decisions, and often published on issues involving forensic mental health expertise and the law. He has also qualified in trial courts several times as an expert on the assessment of competence to stand trial.
2009 Interactive forensic skills workshop-role of the psychiatrist in criminal litigation Steven Pinkert MD, JD
Carla Rodgers MD
Clarence Watson JD, MD
Psychiatry CD 10565 This practical workshop will focus on advanced issues that confront psychiatrists in criminal law cases, an interactive session involving moderator, panelists, and the audience. Vignettes submitted to the panel by practicing forensic psychiatrists will be read aloud and discussed by the panel and by the audience. The vignettes describe problems and experiences that forensic psychiatrists often confront in their practices and in court. Attendees should be able to understand their colleagues approach to issues that routinely confront forensic psychiatrists, and to share in practical methods for dealing with such procedural and substantive challenges. Steven Pinkert, M.D., J.D., MBA of the Pinkert Law Firm in Miami, practices in the areas of professional discipline, complex medical/technical litigation, admiralty, and patent law. Prior to law he practiced clinical psychiatry. Panelists: Carla Rodgers, M.D. is Clinical Assistant Professor at University of Pennsylvania Medical School and in private practice of forensic psychiatry in the Philadelphia area. Clarence Watson, J.D., M.D. is the Clinical Director of Forensic Services at Delaware Psychiatric Center in New Castle, Delaware.
2009 Thelma and Louise-what do we know about women who commit serious crimes and how do we evaluate them? Linda Grounds PhD, Megan McNeal PsyC psychology CD 10575 The number of women charged with serious crimes has increased rapidly over the past few decades. In response, researchers have focused on better understanding the different types of female offenders and how they become involved in criminal activity. As a result of the sharp increase in the numbers of women arrested and charged, many more women are being seen for forensic psychological evaluations. This presentation will provide an overview of current data, summarize research regarding the factors associated with women s criminal behavior, present the results of an original research project, and describe evaluation questions, strategies and assessment tools to consider. Linda M. Grounds, Ph.D. is in private practice in Portland, Oregon.
2009 Mitigation strategies in criminal cases Valerie McClain PsyD psychology CD 10583 This presentation focuses on the role of the forensic psychologist in providing mitigation in the criminal arena including both capital and non-capital cases. Psychological interview techniques, assessment tools and expert testimony that assists in providing effective mitigation efforts will be addressed. Strategies for working with the defense team and judicial system for optimal outcomes will be provided including initial planning stages, preparation for hearings and trial testimony. Specific emphasis will be placed on a conceptual approach that allows for maximum benefit from the forensic expert s efforts. Case examples will be used to illustrate both the technical and strategic aspects of successful mitigation efforts. Valerie R. McClain, Psy.D. is in private practice in forensic psychology and neuropsychology in Tampa, Florida.
2009 Forensic skills workshop-role of the psychologist in civil and criminal litigation Dr Elliot Atkins psychology CD 10593 A forensic skills forum will focus on issues in civil and criminal law that interface with psychology and expert testimony by psychologists. This is an interactive session involving moderator, panelists and audience on advanced ethical and practice issues confronting the forensic psychologist. Vignettes submitted to the panel by practicing forensic psychologists will be read aloud and discussed. The vignettes describe problems and experiences that forensic psychologists often confront in their practices and in court. Attendees will be exposed to a wide variety of forensic cases and problems in civil and criminal areas. Dr. Elliot Atkins (Moderator) is in private practice in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Panelists: Martin H. Williams, Ph.D. and Art Donato, J.D. Mr. Donato is a criminal trial attorney in Media, Pennsylvania.
2009 Delusions and malingering in civil commitment and criminal cases Daisy K. Switzer, Ph.D. psychology CD 10603 While flagrant cases of delusional disorder exist, there are a range of subtle areas in both criminal and civil commitment cases which beg to question what we think we know about the nature of delusions. The application of delusional disorder in civil commit or criminal cases, and the danger of misapplication of the diagnosis will be presented. Cultural context diagnosis and the dangers of prejudice and ethical considerations when the diagnosis will keep a criminal off the street, what is the ethical thing to do? will be discussed. Dr. Switzer does contract evaluations for the Board of Parole Terms and is in private practice, with an emphasis on criminal forensics. Her practice is in Nevada County, with satellite offices in Humboldt and San Francisco.
2009 Adaptive behavior misconceptions about criminal defendants with a mental retardation claim-a response to Widman and Siperstein George Denkowski PhD psychology journal 10780 Upon conducting national surveys over two decades ago regarding mentally retarded offenders in the United States criminal justice system (1, 2), it became evident to us that no standardized instrument had been developed for quantifying accurately the adaptive behavior of members of that sociocultural subgroup. This void persists, and its adverse impact has been exacerbated by many misconceptions that have been injected into criminal proceedings involving a mental retardation claim. As a result, adaptive behavior evaluation has become a focal point of controversy among psychologists. We therefore expected that some opposition would be expressed to the adaptive behavior evaluation model that we introduced recently (3). But our methodology is theoretically sound and has been well-received by fact finders. Moreover, no other system has been proposed in the professional literature which systematically, transparently and quantitatively accounts for the shortcomings inherent in the use of contemporary standardized instruments to establish the adaptive behavior of criminal defendants. We respond here to the reservations Widaman and Siperstein expressed in this issue regarding our evaluation model (4). We begin by outlining its procedures, and then examine each of their concerns.
2008 An acute interest in bad behavior - criminal profiling Timothy Michals MD and Steven Samuel PhD psychiatry CD 10999 A forensic psychiatric profiler is a consultant and investigator who fuses professional experience on the scratchpad of personal intuition and data from crime scenes, victims, and witnesses, to draw a portrait of the type of individual who perpetrated a crime. Various forms of profiling are used to answer four basic questions: who, why, what and when. Crimes benefiting from profiling are those which are seemingly inexplicable, sadistic, bizarre, and apparently motiveless. With few exceptions, the forensic psychiatric profiler's treatise is not admissible in evidence. Despite this, and the lack of scientific evidence with which to assess its validity, criminal profiling is widely used, its status remains largely undisputed, and it has been utilized to apprehend some of the world's most notorious offenders.
2008 Forensic skills workshop: role of the psychiatrist in criminal litigation Steven Pinkert, MD, JD psychiatry CD 10976 no abstract
2008 Psychological profiling of serious crimes Kristine Jacquin PhD psychology CD 10977 Over the past few decades, law enforcement officials have increasingly requested help from psychologists in narrowing down the suspect pool for horrific crimes such as serial sexual homicides. Despite the increased use of psychological profiling by law enforcement agencies, many forensic psychologists and attorneys are hesitant about using this investigative tool. This presentation will provide information to help attorneys and forensic psychologists decide whether psychological profiling could be useful for them. The process of creating a psychological profile, and challenges with using psychological profiles in court will be outlined.
2008 Effects of Eyeglasses and Race on Juror Decisions Involving a Violent Crime
Michael Brown, Ernesto Henriquez, Jennifer Groscu Psychology journal 5440 Past research has demonstrated the influence of appearance on legal decision-making at trial. We investigated how defendant race and eyeglass wearing affect juror decisions. We used a 2 (defendant race: African-American versus Caucasian) x 2 (eyeglasses: present versus not present) experimental design. Two hundred and twenty undergraduates were given a vignette and 1 of 4 photographs of the defendant. Participants rendered a verdict and rated the defendant on a number of characteristics. Eyeglasses had an indirect effect on verdict by increasing ratings of intelligence, which decreased guilty verdicts. Overall, eyeglasses did not affect ratings of defendants attractiveness, friendliness, or threateningness. However, there were several significant interaction effects for race of the defendant and the presence of eyeglasses on these ratings.
2008 Adaptive behavior assessment of criminal defendants with a mental retardation claim George Denkowski PhD and Kathryn Denkowski EdD psychology journal 7001 no abstract
2008 Aliases, nicknames, and epithets in criminal law-commentary Ralph Slovenko HD, PhD psychiatry journal 8017 What about aliases, nicknames, and epithets in criminal law? Arguably, they may be used to establish identity, credibility, or propensity.
2008 An acute interest in bad behavior: criminal profiling Timothy J. Michals, M.D. and Steven E. Samuel, Ph.D. psychiatry CD 10611 A forensic psychiatric profiler is a consultant and investigator who fuses professional experience on the scratchpad of personal intuition and data from crime scenes, victims, and witnesses, to draw a portrait of the type of individual who perpetrated a crime. Various forms of profiling are used to answer four basic questions: who, why, what and when. Crimes benefiting from profiling are those which are seemingly inexplicable, sadistic, bizarre, and apparently motiveless. With few exceptions, the forensic psychiatric profiler's treatise is not admissible in evidence. Despite this, and the lack of scientific evidence with which to assess its validity, criminal profiling is widely used, its status remains largely undisputed, and it has been utilized to apprehend some of the world's most notorious offenders.--Timothy J. Michals, M.D. is Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Division of Forensic Psychiatry at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. Steven E. Samuel, Ph.D. is a clinical and forensic psychologist in Philadelphia.
2008 Forensic skills workshop: the role of the psychiatrist in criminal litigation Steven Pinkert, M.D., J.D., MBA, Carla Rodgers, M.D., Kenneth Weiss, M.D. psychiatry CD 10632 This practical workshop will focus on advanced issues that confront psychiatrists in criminal law cases, an interactive session involving moderator, panelists and the audi ence. Vignettes submitted to the panel by practicing forensic psychiatrists will be read aloud, discussed by the panel and by the audience.--Steven Pinkert, M.D., J.D., MBA of the Pinkert Law Firm in Miami, practices in the areas of professional discipline, complex medical/technical litigation, admiralty, and patent law. Prior to law he prac ticed clinical psychiatry. Carla Rodgers, M.D. is Clinical Assistant Professor at University of Pennsylvania Medical School and in private practice in the Philadelphia area. Kenneth J. Weiss, M.D. is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, and in private practice in Bala Cynwyd, PA.
2008 Psychological profiling of serious crimes Kristine Jacquin, Ph.D. psychology CD 10641 Over the past few decades, law enforcement officials have increasingly requested help from psychologists in narrowing down the suspect pool for horrific crimes such as serial sexual homicides. Despite the increased use of psychological profiling by law enforcement agencies, many forensic psychologists and attorneys are hesitant about using this investigative tool. This presentation will provide information to help attorneys and forensic psychologists decide whether psychological profiling could be useful for them. The process of creating a psychological profile, and challenges with using psychological profiles in court will be outlined.--Kristine Jacquin, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor at Mississippi State University, and a licensed clinical psychologist with a private practice focusing on forensic and neuropsychological evaluations.
2008 Forensic skills workshop: the role of the psychologist in civil and criminal litigation Dr. Elliot Atkins, Martin H. Williams, Ph.D., Art Donato, J.D. psychology CD 10660 A forensic skills forum will focus on issues in civil and criminal law that interface with psychology and expert testimony by psychologists. This is an interactive session involving moderator, panelists and audience on advanced ethical and practice issues confronting the forensic psychologist. Attendees will be exposed to a wide variety of forensic cases and problems in civil and criminal areas as well as become themselves directly involved in this interactive session.--Dr. Elliot Atkins (Moderator) is in private clinical, forensic and consulting practice in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Panelists: Martin H. Williams, Ph.D. and Art Donato, J.D. Mr. Donato is a criminal trial attorney in Media, Pennsylvania.
2008 Identification accuracy of eyewitnesses for a multiple perpetrator crime-examining the simultaneous and elimination lineup procedures Julie L Dempsey MA and Joanna D Pozzulo PhD psychology journal 10778 Identification accuracy of witnesses for multiple perpetrators was examined using two lineup procedures, the simultaneous and elimination. Participants (N = 132) viewed a videotape of a staged theft involving two perpetrators (thief versus accomplice). Each witness was shown two lineups. Target-present and -absent lineups were used with each procedure across each perpetrator. Collapsing across lineup procedure, witnesses were more likely to correctly identify the thief than the accomplice. When either the thief or the accomplice was present in the lineup, identification accuracy did not vary as a function of lineup procedure. When either the thief or the accomplice was absent from the lineup, correct rejection rates were higher with the elimination lineup compared to the simultaneous lineup procedure.
2008 The effects of eyeglasses and race on juror decisions involving a violent crime Michael Brown, Ernesto Henriquez and Jennifer Groscup psychology journal 10784 Past research recent trends in the management of juveniles through juvenile and family courts have brought increased attention to the trial-related abilities of children and adolescents. In the present study, we surveyed 294 low income, urban public school students in grades 5, 7, 9, and 11 to measure their knowledge of court proceedings. Students responses to a group-administered version of the Georgia Court Competence Test revealed that the majority do not possess basic information about court proceedings. Not surprisingly, younger students demonstrated less understanding than older students, but even older students were not able to demonstrate a competent level of understanding using criteria developed in previous studies. The results are discussed in light of emerging studies, and with reference to the challenges that such findings pose for juvenile courts.has demonstrated the influence of appearance on legal decision-making at trial. We investigated how defendant race and eyeglass wearing affect juror decisions. We used a 2 (defendant race: African-American versus Caucasian) x 2 (eyeglasses: present versus not present) experimental design. Two hundred and twenty undergraduates were given a vignette and 1 of 4 photographs of the defendant. Participants rendered a verdict and rated the defendant on a number of characteristics. Eyeglasses had an indirect effect on verdict by increasing ratings of intelligence, which decreased guilty verdicts. Overall, eyeglasses did not affect ratings of defendants attractiveness, friendliness, or threateningness. However, there were several significant interaction effects for race of the defendant and the presence of eyeglasses on these ratings.
2007 Profiling of Serial Homicide and Sex Crime Offenders Kristine Jacquin, Ph.D. psychology CD 10353 Profiling of criminal offenders has been featured on a variety of television shows, such as Law and Order: SVU and Criminal Minds. Despite (and perhaps, because of) the increase in notoriety of psychological profiling, many forensic psychologists may be skeptical of this investigative tool. Is such skepticism warranted? The proposed presentation will evaluate this question by describing common approaches to psychological profiling of serial homicide and sex crime offenders.
2007 Tough Law: parental responsibility for children s crimes Connie Manes JD and Steven Klee, PhD psychology CD 10363 This presentation will review the current trends and legislation regarding holding parents legally responsible for crimes committed by their children. This issue will be discussed from both a legal and psychological viewpoint. The practical implications of dealing with families in mental health settings will be discussed as well as the ethical dilemmas such legislation present. Implications of this legislation and recommendations for best practices by clinicians will be offered.
2007 Conducting Forensic Assessment Screens of Competency to Stand Trial for Misdemeanor Criminal Cases
Lori Martinez, Psy.D. and Maxann Shwartz, Ph.D. psychology CD 10368 This presentation will focus on the process of conducting brief forensic assessment screens of competency to stand trial for defendants facing misdemeanor charges. Specifically, the presenters will discuss the purpose and need to provide courts with efficient and ethical assessments, the pros and cons of a time limited assessment of a large volume of defendants, and will also review and discuss the report format and procedures used. Lori Martinez, Psy.D. is a licensed clinical and forensic psychologist in private practice in New Mexico.
2007 Criminal Law Update: A Look at Some Recent Case Law Steven Pinkert MD, JD, MBA psychiatry CD 10383 Psychiatrists and attorneys will be exposed to case law and changes in statutes that impact forensic psychiatrists and will become familiar with some of the leading developments. There have been some notable developments in case law pertinent to criminal cases. In the aftermath of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling in Atkins v. Virginia and Sell v. United States there have been varied approaches to capital case mental retardation examinations, and the assessment of the impact of medications on an individual who has been, or may be, medicated "into competence." A case from Arizona prompted review of the types of mental defense that the U.S. Constitution requires. There are still some pressing questions about whether those who testify outside of their home jurisdictions are violating local laws (in some states). This session will address these and other important recent developments
2007 Forensic Skills Workshop: The Role of the Psychiatrist in Criminal Litigation Steven Pinkert MD, JD, MBA and Douglas Anderson MD psychiatry CD 10384 This practical workshop will focus on advanced issues that confront psychiatrists in criminal law cases, an interactive session involving moderator, panelists and the audi-ence. Vignettes submitted to the panel by practicing forensic psy-chiatrists will be read aloud, discussed by the panel and by the audience. Steven Pinkert, MD, JD, MBA of the Pink-ert Law Firm in Miami, Florida, practices in the areas of professional discipline, complex medical/technical litigation, admiralty, and patent law. Prior to law he prac-ticed clinical psychiatry. Andrew Schneider, JD is an Attorney at Law in Doyle-stown, PA and Trenton, NJ. Douglas Anderson, MD is in private practice in New York City.
2007 WAIS-III IQs of criminal defendants with a mental retardation claim should not be reduced for the Flynn Effect
George Denkowski PhD
Kathryn Denkowski EdD
psychology journal 7012 It is generally accepted that as intelligence tests' norms age, they tend to produce slightly higher IQs. This phenomenon has come to be called the "Flynn effect," after the person who attempted to measure the rate at which it occurs. On the basis of his work, Flynn came to believe that WAIS-III full scale IQs have inflated by 0.30 points annually since that test s development in 1995, and by an additional 2.34 points due to its "flawed" norms. In response, he began to advocate that WAIS-III full scale IQs of criminal defendants who claim mental retardation should be decreased by those amounts. In this article, we review Flynn's evidence for his two WAIS-III IQ inflation theories. From a scientific perspective, we find that they are not supported by his data. We conclude that reducing WAIS-III full scale IQs for the "Flynn effect" is an unscientific practice, and provide some guidance for dealing with this phenomenon in court.
2007 Differentiation of mentally ill criminal defendants from malingerers on the MKPI-2 and PAI S Thomas Kucharski PhD and Scott Duncan PhD psychology journal 7014 no
2007 Forensic skills workshop-the role of the psychologist in civil and criminal litigation Dr Elliot Atkins, Martin H Williams PhD and Marian Martin PhD psychology CD 10685 no abstract
2006 Equivocal death psychological autopsies in case of criminal homicide Frank Dattillo PhD psychology journal 7018 On a rainy Saturday morning in February, at 2:00 a.m., a middle-aged man in a pickup truck, who will be referred to as Mr. X, pulled up to a local hospital emergency room with a woman in her early 40s. The woman had been shot in the mouth and was wrapped in an old bed sheet. Mr. X informed the officials at the emergency room that he had found the woman lying on the side of the road and picked her up, wrapped her in the only material that he had available, and brought her to the hospital s emergency room...This article reviews the recent literature on psychological autopsies and presents a case vignette in which the defendant was charged with criminal homicide. Psychology
2006 How pop culture contributes to sex crimes Paul Good PhD psychology tape 3237 Mainstream media, MTV, video games and cyber-porn have wired sexually aggressive images into the collective unconscious. The coarsening of pop culture is desensitizing and normalizing sex crimes. As a result, forensic psychologists need to contextualize sex crimes so that the contribution of situational and cultural factors is more fully appreciated. For example, rape and sexual assault derive partly from a new hyper-masculinity and the societal exploitation of women as sex objects. Pedophilic interests may partially correspond to forces in the marketplace that sexualize youth at younger and younger ages. Case examples will illustrate how forensic psychologists, in their reports and testimony, can give the trier of fact a more complex understanding of the causation of these crimes.
2006 Interviewing witnesses of crime R Edward Geiselman PhD psychology tape 3234 The original Cognitive Interview was created, refined, and implemented with funding from the U.S. Department of Justice between 1984 and 1992. The CI is based on memory-retrieval theory from cognitive psychology as well as dyadic communications theory. The CI has been modified for rape and other traumatized victims, mentally challenged persons, and children. The CI has been established as standard procedure for federal, state, and local law-enforcement agencies as well as for all peace officers in the UK. The history of this work will be presented. Attendees will learn about 1) effective techniques for conducting interviews; 2) the application of basic research in psychology to address a real-world need; 3) eyewitness psychology as a science.
2006 The worst of all possible worlds: youth in the adult criminal justice system Anna Scherzer MD psychiatry journal 5037 The functional competency of youth to stand trial has become an increasing problem for the court system. As an increasing number of juveniles face adjudication in both the juvenile and adult criminal justice systems, there is increasing awareness of neurodevelopmental immaturity and its associated cognitive limitations. However, the majority of competency statutes only recognize mental illness or defect as causes of incompetence to stand trial. While youth facing criminal charges may present with a significant incidence of mental illness or defect, most juveniles have not yet developed the cognitive skills requisite for adjudicative competence. For this group the concept of restoration is inappropriate, although they may develop competence through appropriate habilitation. To assure fundamental due process, our adversarial system of criminal justice must recognize the uniqueness of youth s cognitive immaturity, as well as their potential psychological deficits. This article explores the complexities of habilitation of adjudicative competence and dilemmas that must be addressed to assure fairness and due process
2006 Criminal profiling in child sexual assault cases Michael Abramsky PhD
Karol Ross MA JD
psychology journal 6218 Criminal profiling is an investigative technique developed by the FBI to narrow and focus a search for an unknown suspect. This technique may also be utilized to identify whether a defendant in a criminal child sexual assault crime is more or less likely to have committed this offense. The introduction of such profiling data is necessary in cases where there is no objective collaboration and the only evidence is the accusation of an alleged victim. Challenges to the introduction of such data, based on Daubert/Kumho criteria and ultimate question testimony are discussed. The current status of profiling data on child sexual offenders is described.
2006 A retrospective analysis of relationships among nature of crime, service history, recidivism Karen Lippman MA and William Marek PhD psychology tape 3261 Existing research shows there is support for various relationships among nature of crime, mental illness, and community treatment. More specifically, numerous studies have found associations between substance abuse and violent and nonviolent crime. This is a retrospective study of archival data examining relationships among nature of crime, community mental health service history, and recidivism. This presentation will raise awareness that individuals continue to cycle through the criminal justice system despite evidence of existing mental health contacts in the community, specifically with regard to substance abusers. Effectiveness of existing types of community mental health treatment on arrest and recidivism will be addressed.
2006 Forensic skills workshop-role of the psychiatrist in criminal litigation
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Steven Pinkert MD, JD, MBA and Alan Abrams MD, JD Psychiatry CD 2243 This practical workshop will focus on advanced issues that confront psychiatrists in criminal law cases, an interactive session involving moderator, panelists and the audience. Vignettes submitted to the panel by practicing forensic psychiatrists will be read aloud, discussed by the panel and by the audience. Steven Pinkert, M.D., J.D., M.B.A., of the Pinkert Law Firm in Miami, Florida practices in the areas of professional discipline, complex medical/technical litigation, admiralty, and patent law. Prior to law he practiced clinical psychiatry; Alan A. Abrams, M.D., J.D., St. Elizabeth s Hospital, Washington, D.C; Douglas Anderson, M.D. maintains a forensic psychiatry practice in New York City.
2006 Examining the competence of adolescents automatically transferred to adult criminal court Anna Scherzer MD Psychiatry CD 2245 Automatically Transferred to Adult Criminal Court
Many adolescents are automatically transferred to adult criminal court due to the nature of their crime. However, many of these adolescents demonstrate deficits in competence, not merely because of na´vetÚ or treatable psychiatric disorders, but due to cognitive immaturity and lack of appreciation. Adult based competency habilitation programs are usually bifold, teaching facts and treating psychiatric disturbance. There is often little done to address issues of cognitive maturation, especially in the population that has a high percentage of language processing disabilities. The courts are just now becoming increasingly aware of these issues and the dilemma they pose. This talk will address the problem and offer a case study (currently at the level of the appellate courts) as an example. Learning objectives: to understand components of legal competency; to under-stand the interplay of cognitive development and competency. Anna Scherzer, M.D. has been in private practice since 1977, as a clinical pediatrician, a general and child/adolescent psychiatrist and as a forensic psychiatrist.
2006 Asperger's disorder and criminal behavior J Arturo Silva MD and Barbara Haskins, M.D Psychiatry CD 2246 Asperger s Disorder (AD) is considered the prototypical high functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder. AD is characterized by a triad of abnormalities. These abnormalities involve 1) socialization, 2) communication and 3) repetitive special interests. AD may co-occur with various forms of aggression. Some individuals with AD who present with violent behaviors may also become in-volved in criminal activities. In this presentation we will provide an overview of basic diagnostic issues regarding AD. We will then discuss how certain features may increase the risk of criminal behaviors in some affected persons. Specific cases will be presented to highlight relevant psychiatric-legal issues. Attendees will learn 1) basic diagnostic features of Asperger s Disorder; 2) common comorbid psychiatric disorders; and 3) features of Asperger s Disorder that may increase the risk for aggression and associated criminal behaviors. J. Arturo Silva, M.D. is a forensic psychiatrist in private practice in San Jose, California; Bar-bara Haskins, M.D. is a staff psychiatrist at the Western State Hospital in Staunton, Virginia. She is also in private practice in forensic psychiatry.
2006 Interviewing witnesses of crime R Edward Geiselman PhD psychology CD 10708 The original Cognitive Interview was created, refined, and implemented with funding from the U.S. Department of Justice between 1984 and 1992. The CI is based on memory-retrieval theory from cognitive psychology as well as dyadic communications theory. The CI has been modified for rape and other traumatized victims, mentally challenged persons, and children. The CI has been established as standard procedure for federal, state, and local law-enforcement agencies as well as for all peace officers in the UK. The history of this work will be presented. Attendees will learn about 1) effective techniques for conducting interviews; 2) the application of basic research in psychology to address a real-world need; 3) eyewitness psychology as a science.
2006 How pop culture contributes to sex crimes Paul Good PhD psychology CD 10711 Mainstream media, MTV, video games and cyber-porn have wired sexually aggressive images into the collective unconscious. The coarsening of pop culture is desensitizing and normalizing sex crimes. As a result, forensic psychologists need to contextualize sex crimes so that the contribution of situational and cultural factors is more fully appreciated. For example, rape and sexual assault derive partly from a new hyper-masculinity and the societal exploitation of women as sex objects. Pedophilic interests may partially correspond to forces in the marketplace that sexualize youth at younger and younger ages. Case examples will illustrate how forensic psychologists, in their reports and testimony, can give the trier of fact a more complex understanding of the causation of these crimes.
2006 Forensic skills workshop-role of the psychologist in civil and criminal litigation Elliot Atkins EdD et al psychology CD 10723 A forensic skills forum will focus on issues in civil and criminal law that interface with psychology and expert testimony by psychologists. This is an interactive session involving moderator, panelists and audience on advanced ethical and practice issues confronting the forensic psychologist. Attendees will be exposed to a wide variety of forensic cases and problems in civil and criminal areas as well as become themselves directly involved in this interactive session. Elliot Atkins, Ed.D. (Moderator) private clinical, forensic and consulting practice, Pennsylvania and New Jersey; Sean Kennedy, J.D., Senior Deputy Public Defender, Los Angeles; Martin H. Williams, Ph.D., private practice, Sunnyvale, California; Alex Yufik, J.D., Psy.D., Adjunct Professor, California State University of Los Angeles
2006 A retrospective analysis of relationships among nature of crime, service history, recidivism Karen Lippman MA and William Marek PhD psychology CD 10736 Existing research shows there is support for various relationships among nature of crime, mental illness, and community treatment. More specifically, numerous studies have found associations between substance abuse and violent and nonviolent crime. This is a retrospective study of archival data examining relationships among nature of crime, community mental health service history, and recidivism. This presentation will raise awareness that individuals continue to cycle through the criminal justice system despite evidence of existing mental health contacts in the community, specifically with regard to substance abusers. Effectiveness of existing types of community mental health treatment on arrest and recidivism will be addressed.
2005 The watering down of PTSD in criminal law Ralph Slovenko JD, PhD psychiatry tapes 3149 There is nothing new about the phenomenon of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) but there have been developments in its diagnosis and treatment and its role in litigation. These will be viewed from the perspective of an attorney.
2005 Interactive forensic skills workshop: criminal session (2 tapes) Steven Pinkert MD, JD psychiatry tapes 3153 This utilitarian workshop will focus on advanced issues that confront psychiatrists in criminal law cases, an interactive session involving moderator, panelists and the audience. Vignettes submitted to the panel by practicing forensic psychiatrists will be read aloud, discussed by the panel and by the audience.
2005 How to provide expert testimony in civil and criminal cases: what every expert and lawyer needs to know
Karen E Koskoff MA, JD psychology tape 3195 Every expert needs to be effective in the courtroom using powerful and persuasive language that meets legal challenges. Experts need to know how to persuade, use demonstrable evidence and to teach the jury and judge effectively. Attendees will learn how to bolster opinions during cross-examination, to write a comprehensive report, to properly prepare a case, and how to handle the lawyers, including those with whom they are working most closely. Lawyers need to know how to prepare their experts for cross-examination, protect them in the courtroom, provide them with the support necessary to ensure their opinions are heard, understood and accepted.
2005 10 major problems with criminal profiling Richard Kocsis MCrim, PhD psychiatry journal 7063 Profiling is a process of observation and reflection during which an attempt is made to reassemble the collected pieces of a criminal puzzle as the investigating profiler tries to answer the basic questions: Why, where, when, how and who? It may be well served by typologies of past crimes that are useful in the investigation of present crimes. Specifically, it is a technique aimed at identifying and interpreting crime behavior or actions for the purpose of predicting the personality of the offender, his modus operandi, and, possibly, the motivation for the crime. Despite the apparent popularity of criminal profiling among the law enforcement community, scrutiny of its merits does not appear to have occurred to any substantial extent. This article identifies and assesses ten significant problems surrounding the theoretical literature and the professional practice of criminal profiling. It highlights a number of shortcomings in both the research and practice of profiling and serves to demonstrate that a disparity exists between the perceptions and the realities of what criminal profiling can reliably achieve. Suggestions for how the research and practice of profiling may be advanced are discussed.
2004 Evaluating recidivism risk for criminal sentencing James W Schutte PhD psychology tape 3072 Forensic psychologists often receive requests to render professional opinions on a criminal defendant s risk of recidivism. Although this practice has been justly criticized in the past as being largely inaccurate, in recent years several objective instruments have been developed to assist the professional in this effort. These instruments will be discussed.
2004 Revisiting the foundation for the expression of your opinions in criminal cases John T Philipsborn JD psychiatry tapes 3134 A criminal defense lawyer and expert on mental health issues and the law, will provide suggestions on how to prepare the foundation for your courtroom testimony, given recent developments in the law in both the federal and state courts; he will present information on what changes in the law the expert should be aware of when presenting evidence in cases involving questions of insanity, competence, sexually violent predators, and other matters often at issue in our courts
2004 The automatism defense in criminal cases Michael F. Elterman, PhDJ psychology tape 3074 Sane automatisms can result from an external factor such as an injection of insulin, a blow to the head, or involuntary ingestion of a drug. This presentation will focus on the history of the automatism defense, medical conditions that give rise to this defense and the assessment of clients who claim an absence of mind at the time of committing a criminal act.
2003 Police training materials-an important foundation for mental health expertise in criminal cases John T. Philipsborn, JD psychiatry journal 382 A combination of modernization, increased professionalism, and litigation have caused many police departments throughout the United States to provide their officers with ongoing training in interrogation and interviewing techniques. As the author points out, knowing about this training, and accompanying training materials, may assist a mental health expert in understanding how officers approached a particular investigation, interrogation, or interview. In particular, the techniques used may have been influenced not only by the training, but also by the theories upon which that training is based. The author, an experienced criminal defense lawyer who has written and lectured on the subject of police interrogation training, examines how a basic knowledge of police interrogation training materials may assist a mental health expert in approaching his or her task, particularly where and when the fruit of an interrogation or interview is at issue.
2003 The forensic evaluation of a mentally retarded criminal in a capital case Timothy Michals MD
Steven Samuel PhD
psychiatry tapes 3003 While the Supreme Court offers no guidance on how the diagnosis of mentally retardation should be properly defined for purposes of capital punishment, their ruling signified that all 20 states which allowed execution of retarded killers would have to develop procedures to determine who is mentally deficient. A capital case in which the speakers consulted, involving an adult who had been diagnosed with mental retardation, will be presented.
2003 Criminal case competence to stand trial evaluations: legal and psychiatric issues John T. Philipsborn, JD
psychiatry tapes 3004 A criminal defense lawyer revisits the current state of the law and state of the art of criminal case competence-to-stand-trial evaluations. As pointed out in United States v. Duhon, the very definition of competence to stand trial has been changing over the past 15 years. Future court decisions are likely to refine the definition further. The state of the law and professional practices are discussed.
2003 Can psychologists testify to state of mind in criminal proceedings? Recent experiences John Podboy PhD , Albert J Kastl PhD psychology tape 3046 Recent case law has limited testimony concerning state of mind, malice aforethought, and similar characterizations. Attendees will become familiar with the current legal standards in regard to testimony concerning state of mind at the time of commission of a crime. Case examples will be utilized to illustrate this issue.
2003 Competency to stand trial and criminal responsibility: an examination of racial and gender differences among African American and Caucasian pretrial defendants Roslyn Caldwell PhD psychology journal 386 This investigation examined the differences between races and genders with respect to treatment histories, diagnoses, psycholegal decisions, and treatment recommendations. A total of 168 Caucasian males, 30 Caucasian females, 126 African American males, and 33 African American females were referred to an outpatient community mental health facility for evaluations of competency to stand trial and criminal responsibility. Consistent with the distribution of psychological disorders in general clinical settings, African Americans were more frequently diagnosed with psychotic disorders, while Caucasians were more frequently diagnosed with mood and substance related disorders, and other Axis I disorders. In addition, males were more frequently diagnosed with mood disorders, and females were more frequently diagnosed with a combination of psychotic, other Axis I disorders, and substance-related disorders. Results pertaining to psycholegal decisions revealed that defendants diagnosed with psychotic disorders were more likely to be found incompetent to stand trial. These results offer several insights into the nature of pretrial evaluations and the factors that effect psycholegal decisions.
2003 Evaluation language competency in criminal cases Linda J Gummow PhD psychology tape 1379 no abstract
2003 Forensic skills: interactive workshop-civil and criminal (2 tapes) and others same place Elliot Atkins, Ed.D. psychology tape 10277 A forensic skills forum will focus on issues in civil and criminal law that interface with psychology and expert testimony by psychologists. This is an interactive session involving moderator, panelists and audience on advanced ethical and practice issues confronting the forensic psychologist. Attendees will be exposed to a wide variety of forensic cases and problems in civil and criminal areas as well as become themselves directly involved in this interactive session.
2002 Learning from errors- a database of completely innocent people wrongfully convicted of crimes Dr Edmund S Higgins psychiatry tapes 2030 Despite the high standard for determining guilt in the United States, innocent people are sent to prison for crimes they have not committed. The author has researched publications describing examples of wrongful convictions that were reversed with new evidence establishing innocence. Approximately 300 cases have been found and analyzed. The details of the cases have been categorized and stored in a database available on the World Wide Web. The most common errors are eyewitness misidentification, false confessions, false informants and official misconduct. Psychiatrists can be instrumental in educating juries about the imprecise nature of some evidence presented in criminal court. Attendees will understand the common errors in wrongful convictions and the importance of learning from these errors, and will appreciate the problem of rigid thinking.

2002 Crime type and specific personality indicia - Cloninger s TCI Impulsivity, empathy and attachment subscales in non-violent and sexual offenders David Nussbaum PhD psychology journal 5418 The present study investigated personality differences in violent, non-violent and sexual offenders incarcerated at a medium security federal penitentiary. The Temperament and Character Inventory was administered to 185 male inmates specifically to obtain, among other data, personality measures of impulsiveness, attachment, and empathy. Criminal records were reviewed and crime type was assigned according to offense history. Age at first offense was also examined. Violent offenders were found to be more impulsive and less empathic than nonviolent offenders. Sexual offenders were found to be less impulsive, more empathic, more attached, and to have a later age of onset than all other offenders. Identifying variables associated with different types of criminal behavior may have important implications for treatment.
2001 A study of crime scene analysis in the forensic evaluation of criminal responsibility Deborah Miscoll PsyD psychology journal 369 The extent to which forensic examiners investigate and analyze information pertaining to physical evidence and the crime scene varies widely, despite the fact that some experts have emphasized the importance of investigative data as part of a comprehensive evaluation of criminal responsibility. Experts claim such procedural variability influences the judgment of forensic examiners and contributes to disagreements between them when they are formulating opinions about a perpetrator s criminal responsibility. This study utilized a single-subject, multiple baseline research design in an attempt to document the extent to which training in behavioral crime scene analysis would produce a change in evaluation of criminal responsibility in homicide cases that reflected either an organized or disorganized crime scene structure.
2001 Second opinion--legal consultation in criminal competency evaluation Daniel Greenfield MD, MPH psychology tape 1047 no abstract
2001 Forensic skills- mental state and mitigation in criminal cases for the defense Valerie R. McClain, Psy.D. psychology tape 10252 Speaker highlights unique applications of expert services in two criminal cases. The first case involves retrospective analysis of mental state during a plea of nolo contendere in a post-conviction case; the second illustrates expert services in providing mitigating factors relevant for both the guilt and sentencing phases in a triple homicide case. Psychological and neuropsychological test results are presented, coupled with relevant mitigating factors to provide the basis for providing expert services. Learning objectives: to identify possible applications of forensic assessment and expert skills in mitigation, and creative and proactive approaches in forensic evaluation in criminal cases.


2001 Second opinion--legal consultation in criminal competency evaluation Daniel Greenfield MD, MPH psychology tape 2047 no abstract
2001 Second opinion--legal consultation in criminal competency evaluation Daniel Greenfield MD, MPH psychology journal 5323 no abstract
2000 Psychiatric testimony on character, inconsistent personality evidence in criminal cases Ralph Slovenko JD, PhD psychiatry tapes 1010 Evidence of the character of the accused almost always has some value as circumstantial evidence as to how the individual acted (and perhaps with what state of mind) in the matter in question. The use of expert psychiatric testimony to establish an "inconsistent personality defense" is controversial. Various cases involving character evidence are discussed. Participants will learn the scope of the use of character evidence.
2000 Combining cognitive psychology and relapse prevention to reduce criminal recidivism William Marek PhD psychology journal 370 This article advocates combining Rational Emotive Therapy, relapse prevention and criminal personality material to change belief systems in order to promote personally beneficial, prosocial behaviors. This amalgam of treatment philosophies is didactical, based on personal responsibility and attempts to minimize obfuscation, excuses, apologia, justifications, denials and rationalizations.
2000 Yochelson and Samenow's The Criminal Personality and Walters' The Criminal Lifestyle William Marek PhD psychology tape 1108 In their own way, each of these works represent the pinnacle of thought regarding the origin, nature, and treatment of criminals. Both theories are designed to provide practical guidelines in conceptualizing and treating criminals. This presentation will compare and contrast these two similar, yet disparate, viewpoints and treatment modalities. Effective treatment of criminals comes only from a clear understanding of their true nature.

2000 Dissociative identity disorder and criminal intent-an approach to determining responsibility J Robert Noonan PhD psychology journal 381 DID has become more prevalent in court, warranting even greater scrutiny of its alleged reality. Overviews of the current mental health literature on the subject and of judicial approaches to the specific problem of assessing responsibility of a defendant claiming multiple identities are presented, and the issues and challenges facing the psychologist-evaluator in a representative case are described. An approach to assessing the responsibility of such defendants is proposed, with the goal being to provide a guideline from which clarity might be enhanced and a reasoned professional opinion can be submitted to the court.
2000 Is the patient malingering? standards, case law, testimony in criminal cases John T. Philipsborn, JD psychiatry tape 1122 This presentation will discuss standards which have been applied to either allow or limit the testimony of psychiatrists and psychologists on the issue of malingering. Examples of specific criminal case situations will be discussed, such as malingering in the competence assessment arena, and in the presentation, or rebuttal, of mental defenses. The presenter recently litigated a lengthy case dealing with malingering and has written and lectured to many groups of lawyers and mental health professionals on a variety of issues.
1999 Diplomacy in criminal court testimony-proactive strategies for the expert Valerie R. McClain, Psy.D. psychology tape 1167 Expert testimony in criminal court proceedings necessitates proactive strategies in order to anticipate potential challenges to credibility, adversarial cross-examination, and the best use of clinical data. Case reports will be used to highlight the importance of strategic planning when providing services as a forensic expert. A step-by-step approach will be detailed utilizing cases in order to identify necessary safeguards for planning participation in criminal proceedings. Attendees will be able to identify key factors in strategically planning to provide proactive criminal court expert testimony at critical stages including initial recruitment, assessment, testimony and recommendations; anticipate and plan for potential challenges to expert testimony in criminal court proceedings.
1999 Association between crime and drug dependence and changes after Michael R. Gossop, PhD psychiatry tapes 1143 The National Treatment Outcome Research Study (NTORS) is the largest study of treatment outcome for drug misusers ever conducted in the UK. Head of Research at Maudsley Hospital in London discusses results and implications
1999 Forensic evaluation of crime as a projective phenomenon-restoring disciplined listening to forensic evaluation Larry Larsen PhD psychology journal 1194 As a psychologist or clinical professional interviews the perpetrator of a crime, is there a projective phenomenon in place? Does the perpetrator s description of the crime comprise a useful source of data for the careful, listening psychologist? The present theory insists that important sources of data are frequently unseen and proposes a theory to contribute practical help and to generate future research.
1999 Psychosis in violent crime R.J. Brown, Ph.D. psychiatry tapes 1129 no abstract
1997 Attention deficit disorder and criminal behavior- criminal forensic examination Robert E Chapman MD psychiatry tapes 1288 The incidence and relevance of Attention Deficit Disorder in children and adults may be unappreciated by most forensic psychiatrists. Three forensic criminal murder cases will demonstrate the severe consequences of undiagnosed and under treated childhood and adolescent Attention Deficit Disorder and the abuse that frequently accrues to these individuals and their reactions. Participants will learn the relevance of Attention Deficit Disorder to criminal and antisocial behavior and how to detect and include it as a diagnosis in "criminal forensic examination."


1997 Naming the charge: criminal justice decision-making with a group of mentally ill and homeless defendants Danielle Laberge PhD psychiatry journal 8064 This article examines the choice of criminal charges made by the police and by the prosecution when dealing with homeless and mentally disturbed individuals. This decision has an important impact on the risk-evaluation of offenders. Using a sample of 22 individuals suffering from these problems, objective characteristics of the event and of the accused, as well as subjective characteristics are examined in relation to the official charge. The analysis concludes that overcharging by police and by prosecution are not based on objective seriousness of the offense but rather on their perception of the accused s need of psychiatric help.
1997 Nuts and bolts issues-circumstances leading up to board complaints, ethical complaints, legal action, malpractice, criminal action and what to do what these happen Penny Clemmons, Ph.D., J.D. psychology tape 9093 no abstract
1996 The effectiveness of multicultural sensitivity in criminal sentencing cases Barbara C. Counter, Ph.D. psychology tape 1405 To develop persuasive psychosocial arguments for alternative sentencing, sensitivity to multicultural issues is essential, How these issues can be researched, delineated and presented to the court in its efforts to construct fair and meaningful sentences will be detailed in two cases. Participants will recognize and effectively utilize multicultural differences in preparing alternative sentencing reports.
1996 Role of psychologists in criminal forensic cases in South Africa Annelies Du Plessis MA psychology tape 10017 This paper presents the case of a 24-year-old male who was referred to the forensic unit of a state psychiatric institution for observation to determine his criminal responsibility on a charge of rape and murder.
1996 The exculpatory power of personality disorders in criminal law Emily Fallis, PhD psychology tape 9034 The mental state of a defendant is relevant to every legal act, every phase of trial, and the crime itself. Etiological and theoretical considerations with regard to personality disorders are critical in determining their exculpatory power in criminal law. The position that individuals with personality disorders can choose, for instance, whether or not to commit a crime must be examined in light of evidence which highlights the immutable nature of such disorders. Participants will be able to describe the exculpatory utility of Axis II diagnoses in criminal proceedings
1996 Mental disorder and criminal offense category-in search of a relationship among female criminal defendants Yekeen Aderbdigbe MD psychiatry journal 379 This study examined the relationship between mental disorder and criminal offense category among a sample of women who were charged with a criminal offense and referred for a forensic psychiatric evaluation. Major psychiatric morbidities were frequent among the women in this study. Twenty-three percent of the women had a diagnosis of schizophrenia, 24 percent had a diagnosis of major affective disorders, and 17 percent had a diagnosis of psychoactive substance use disorders. Seven percent had a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder and 9 percent were diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder. The combined rates for schizophrenia, major affective disorders and psychoactive substance use disorders was 55 percent, and the combined rates for both borderline and antisocial personality disorders was 16 percent.





1996 Cocaine, homicide and criminal responsibility Hadley Osran MD psychiatry journal 380 Cocaine use produces a wide range of psychiatric symptoms. Therefore, a criminal defendant who was under the influence of cocaine at the time of the alleged crime, may have been suffering from sufficient mental impairment in which a cocaine-related psychiatric defense may be viable. For example, a defendant suffering from an acute, nonpsychotic cocaine intoxication may be confused, agitated, hostile and impulsive. These symptoms may impair the defendant s ability to premeditate during the commission of a homicide, thus reducing the defendant s degree of culpability. Because of its effects, cocaine use has played a major role in the increase of violent crime in this country. This article reviews two cases in which cocaine use had a substantial role in the commission of homicide. The issues regarding cocaine related psychiatric impairment, the defendant s mental state and criminal responsibility will be discussed. In addition, this article will provide an overview of the legal aspects of criminal responsibility. Lastly, the pertinent legal case precedents will be discussed.
1996 Violent crime in psychiatric patients-relationship to frontal lobe impairment Menahem Krakowski MD
psychiatry journal 9022 This study found an association between violent crime in the community and impairment on neuropsychological tasks, specifically the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and psychomotor tasks.

1995 Criminals who testify-unique opportunity for psychotherapeutic change Leslie K. Knutson, Ph.D. psychology tape 10022 no abstract
1995 Investigative profiling-a behavioral analysis of the crime scene Jack Annon PhD psychology journal 2144 This article describes the theory behind investigative profiling, the data base that is used, and how this information may provide law enforcement with specific information that will hopefully eliminate unlikely suspects, and suggest a "profile" of the individual who may have committed the crime.
1995 Mock trial: competence in criminal cases (2 tapes) Roger T Sharp JD psychiatry tapes 1328 no abstract
1994 Not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder Joseph A Noone MD psychiatry tapes 1931 For the first time since the 1800s, there has been a change in the Criminal Code of Canada regarding mentally ill persons in conflict with the law. The intent of the amendments was to reduce prolonged detention of insanity acquittees. Such changes require that mental health professionals, serving as consultants to the judicial system or as practitioners need to reassess what the new provisions ask of them. A number of ambiguities require clarification. Dr. Noone outlines the changes in the new law, differences from the prior law and clarifies ambiguous portions of the new law and assess whether it has fulfilled its purpose.
1994 Criminalization of the mentally ill Franklin Master MD psychiatry tapes 1933 no abstract
1992 Cognitive psychology and the criminal personality William Marek PhD psychology tape 1946 Few social problems are more important and more enduring than that of violent crime. Speaker reviews a treatment modality, using cognitive psychology as an instrument.
1992 Mental retardation as a defense to criminal behavior Dr Verdun Trione psychology tape 1989 Expert psychologist and defense attorney review a case in which mental retardation was used as a legal defense. The case involving a firebombing that resulted in the death of two victims. Two teenage perpetrators and their 33-year-old driver were tried separately for the crime.
1992 Sexual homicide- offender descriptions, crime variables, diagnoses- 15 cases reviewed Joseph A Noone MD psychiatry tapes 1897 Speaker undertakes reviews fifteen cases of sexual homicide. Objective of the study is to define subgroups in this population. Cases include descriptions of offenders, crime variables, diagnoses and situational factors.
1992 Juvenile criminal responsibility and the courts Julianne Lockwood PhD psychology journal 358 The issue of whether to prosecute and sentence a youthful criminal offender as a juvenile or adult is one which typically has challenged attorneys and psychologists alike. This article summarizes past and current inconsistencies and contradictions in public, legal, and psychological thinking that have contributed to the confusion and ambivalence inherent in the various transfer laws, the nature of existing statutory and psychological guidelines regarding the binding-over of juveniles to adult court, and the contribution of psychologists to transfer proceedings.
1992 Abandonment adult rage-the root of violent criminal acts Faith Leibman MA, JD psychology journal 359 This article explores the underlying dynamics of acts of violence and the development and implementation of treatment programs for violent offenders. Acts of violence seldom occur in a vacuum.




1992 Criminalization of the mentally ill: problems and proposals for networking the system John Dupre MD psychiatry tapes 1910 no abstract
1992 False confession- manipulative interrogation of the mentally disordered criminal suspect Howard Terrell MD and William Logan JD psychiatry journal 6059 The majority of all criminal cases in the United States are solved by confession. A great deal has been written on the topic of interrogation techniques for law enforcement personnel. Very little has been written, however, on "false confessions" that have been obtained under police interrogation and later recanted. The following case history is that of a 64-year-old Korean war veteran who was manipulated into giving a "false confession" under intense police interrogation. The interrogation, itself, was conducted in a manner that recreated many circumstances similar to those in Korea that initially lead to his Post-traumatic Stress Disorder. This rendered him much more vulnerable to the interrogators manipulative efforts.
1992 Allegations of sexual abuse:case example of a criminal defense Terence Campbell PhD psychology journal 5023 This article outlines how a psychologist can assist in defending an individual who appeared unjustly accused of criminal sexual conduct. It applies previously published conceptualizations related to false accusations of sexual abuse (1) to expert testimony in a criminal matter. The defense strategy developed for this case was unusual because it did not involve any clinical evaluations. Instead, the expert's testimony confined itself entirely to applying relevant research evidence to the issues of this case.
1992 Childhood abandonment/adult rage-the root of violent criminal acts Faith Leibman JD psychology journal 8151 no abstract
1991 Cross-examination of the mental health expert in the criminal case Jeremy Margolis JD
Jerome Schulte MD
psychiatry tapes 1871 Inspector General of the State of Illinois and Director of the Illinois State Police discusses cross examination of the forensic mental health expert in the criminal case. Legal advice.
1991 Celebrity crimes Bruce Danto MD psychiatry tapes 1858 no abstract
1991 Dissociation and unconsciousness as a defense in the criminal case Daniel Schiele MD, PhD psychiatry journal 5250 Legal problems with the concept of dissociation are reviewed. Unconsciousness in dissociation is an affectively altered cognitive state. The individual is, therefore, unable to form specific or criminal intent representing a defense reaction to a perceived real or imagined physical or psychological threat. Amnesia, in the case of a pawnbroker who shot his estranged wife and her attorney in front of witnesses in his store, is explained by a psychiatrist who is a specialist in the area of dissociative disorders.
1991 Importance of criminal behavior related variables in criminal prognosis Aurora Valenzuela MD, PhD psychology journal 5294 Determining whether or not an individual is dangerous is difficult and the ability to predict future behavior is very low. Reports of study carried by the authors on 156 convicted subjects by the Department of Forensic Medicine of the University of Granada in Spain. Accuracy of prognoses of dangerousness were assessed along with other variables that might served as superior predictors.
1991 Decision to criminally prosecute the psychiatric patient J Reid Meloy PhD psychiatry journal 5227 There is indirect evidence that mental health professionals are more inclined to actively participate in the criminal prosecution of violent psychiatric patients. Author reveals fourteen factors that may warrant the clinical decision to criminally prosecute a patient, including offense characteristics, patient history and social and policy issues. Although the science of human behavior is deterministic, mental health professionals are disinclined to ignore volitional behavior in their treatment of psychiatric patients.
1991 Reading the Supreme Court's tea leaves-predicting judicial behavior in civil and criminal right to refuse treatment cases Michael Perlin JD psychiatry journal 5204 The question of the right to refuse antipsychotic medication remains the most important and volatile aspect of the legal regulation of mental health practice, and it is essential that both practitioners and forensic experts familiarize themselves with recent case law and constitutional developments.
1991 A five-year plus follow-up survey of criminal recidivism within a treated cohort of 406 pedophiles,111 exhibitionists and 109 sexual aggressives: issues and outcome Fred Berlin MD, PhD psychiatry journal 5050 no abstract
1991 Reading the Supreme Court's tea leaves-predicting judicial behavior in civil and criminal right to refuse treatment cases Michael Perlin JD psychiatry journal 8041 no abstract
1991 Dissociation and unconsciousness as a defense in the criminal case Daniel Schiele MD, PhD psychiatry tape 1725 Legal problems with the concept of dissociation are reviewed. Unconsciousness in dissociation is an affectively altered cognitive state. The individual is, therefore, unable to form specific or criminal intent representing a defense reaction to a perceived real or imagined physical or psychological threat. Amnesia, in the case of a pawnbroker who shot his estranged wife and her attorney in front of witnesses in his store, is explained by a psychiatrist who is a specialist in the area of dissociative disorders.
1990 The traumatized crime victim- how to perform an intake and cope with legal issues Shelley Neiderbach PhD psychology tape 1767 Using a case study of a traumatized crime victim, author demonstrates how to perform and analyze an intake, using DSM criteria, develop a twofold treatment plan and cope with management and legal issues.
1990 Dementia as a legal defense in civil and criminal diminished capacity cases Jay Cohn MD, PhD, JD psychiatry tapes 1714 no abstract
1990 Criminal offender: seductions of crime, visible and invisible motivations (1 of 2) Jack Katz PhD, JD psychology tape 1752 Motivations leading to passion, murder, amateur, adolescent, nonviolent property crime and robbery are examined. Offenders' experiences of the seductions of crime will be compared with common background theories and with the types of explanation that offenders are often induced to provide.
1990 The criminal mind-early reflections and subsequent observations Raymond Lande DO psychiatry journal 5134 A correlation appears to exist between traumatic early memories and belligerent behavior. The central question is whether convicted felons would, as a group, exhibit unique screen memories? - early memories that function to disguise and repress far more painful recollections. Repetition of long forgotten childhood events may be expressed in later emotional problems. This may in part account for child abuse victims becoming adult perpetrators. Relationships between these early screen memories and subsequent criminal behavior were studied. One finding was that of 20 respondents in the study convicted of murder, 16 recalled painful events.
1989 Forensic psychiatric assessments in criminal cases and the judiciary Thane Crossley PhD
Roger Guzman MD
psychiatry tapes 1788 Development, general operation and evaluation of a progressive inpatient forensic mental health unit. Authors report functions and success of 17-bed forensic unit servicing patients assessed by the courts and describe treatment and long-term planning for offenders by a multidisciplinary team.
1989 Criminal state of mind testimony- brief history and cross-examination issues Andrew J Thorpe JD
Donald Baumeister JD
psychology tape 1492 While intoxication and mental disability are still valid defenses to most types of crime, a number of new developments and their impact on those accused of criminal acts are reviewed. Challenges to psychological testimony under cross-examination discussed.
1989 Cognitive and volitional defenses to charges of criminal culpability Angela Raimo EdD, JD psychology journal 6018 Author traces legal background of cognitive and volitional mental state defenses, noting progressive tendency of courts to admit reliable psychiatric and psychological evidence and opinion that weigh on motivational dimensions of criminal cases involving free will, deliberation and premeditation. Also discusses criticism of the M'Naghten test and roots of the mental disease or defect defense. Relevant legal cases reviewed and discussed.
1989 Females incarcerated for assaultive crimes- personality and demographic variables Glenace Edwall PhD psychology journal 5067 Files of 53 female inmates were investigated in order to help delineate differences between those offenders who assault significant others vs. those who assault relative strangers. Implications for treatment, based on these findings, are discussed.
1988 Consultant to the crime team- personal observations Eric Marcus MD psychiatry tapes 10045 The author discusses his role as mental health consultant to the police by reviewing a particularly puzzling case involving the brutal murder of a child.
1988 Criminal psychopaths- theories and discussion of causalities of criminal behavior Gerard Neuman PhD psychology tape 10164 Review of historical development in understanding psychopathy and problems in predicting future behavior and risk of dangerousness.
1988 Substance abuse as crimogenic - the defense case and assay evidence Nathaniel Pallone PhD psychology tape 10193 Construction of the most adequate defense case requires laboratory assay evidence in preference to self-report or observation by witness, victim, or arresting officer.
1988 Crime and mental illness as observed in the county jail Alfred E. Fireman, MD psychiatry tapes 1825 People in county jail are innocent people, that is to say, they have been arrested and have been found deserving of the experience of trial; they have, for whatever reason, not met bail bond or otherwise found a way out of incarceration until due justice and due process has been afforded them, but they prevail as innocent people. Just because a person is behind bars does not mean that he is guilty of the crime for which he has been arrested. There is also discussion of of the plight of the chronically mentally and emotionally ill who are in and out of the prison system, and the failure of the criminal justice system in rehabilitating inmates. The speaker urges privatization of jails as a hopeful alternative to the county and state s fiscal failures and humanitarian failures alike. There needs to be prison reform in the US.
1988 Borderline personality and the crime of fraud among women Dr. Peggy R. Koopman psychiatry tapes 1829 Dr. Koopman develops a working theory about the dynamic between the presence of a borderline personality and the commission of the specific crime of fraud among women. Why crime is the overt behavior and why this particular crime are questions that are explored. Clinical examples of patients assessed and treated who exhibit this pattern, include a group of five women who identified themselves as "the fraud squad."
1988 Forensic evaluations-criminal cases in federal courts Martin Bohn PhD psychology journal 5061 Forensic evaluations, in response to court orders, conclude with reports prepared for the court that deal primarily with psychological or mental health variables as these relate to legal issues. Imperatives in evaluating and writing such reports are discussed.
1988 Organic mental disorders and criminal behavior Philip Hicks MD psychiatry journal 6006 no abstract
1988 Post-traumatic stress disorder as a legal defense in criminal trials Harold Hall PhD psychiatry journal 8032 no abstract
1988 The psychiatrist as consultant to the crime team-personal observations Dr Anthony Marcus psychiatry journal 8034 no abstract
1988 The psychological interview in criminal cases-The forensic interview and commentaries (entire journal, 90 pages) The psychological interview (group) psychology journal 8136 no abstract
1988 Forensic evaluations-criminal cases in federal courts Martin Bohn PhD psychology tape 10158 Forensic evaluations, in response to court orders, conclude with reports prepared for the court that deal primarily with psychological or mental health variables as these relate to legal issues. Imperatives in evaluating and writing such reports are discussed.
1987 Post-traumatic stress disorder- successful civil and criminal defense cases Jerome Platt PhD
Stephen Husband MA
psychology tape 10176 Psychologists discuss recent case law and research findings that they have found to be helpful instruments when representing PTSD claimants.
1987 Post-traumatic stress disorder as a legal defense in criminal trials Harold Hall hD, Frederic Hall JD psychology journal 6028 A diagnosis of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder can be established, its severity can be measured, and a determination can be made as to whether or not the existence of this disorder is relevant to alleged criminal behavior. Focus is on PTSD as a legal defense. 19 leading posttraumatic stress disorder legal cases and court decisions are offered,along with suggested readings.
1987 Post-traumatic stress disorder- successful civil and criminal defense cases Jerome Platt PhD and Stephen Husband MA psychology tape 10766 Psychologists discuss recent case law and research findings that they have found to be helpful instruments when representing PTSD claimants.
1986 Post-traumatic stress disorder of the delayed type- defense in criminal proceedings Michael Cleary MD psychiatry tapes 1771 The chronic, or delayed subtype, is most often applied to the war veteran. By demonstrating potential for abuse, clinicians will be helped to avoid inappropriate use of this category and consequent misuse of mental health resources. Cases presented include State v Jensen (double murder, 1973), resulting in conviction but appealed in 1985 on grounds of previously undiagnosed PTSD.
1986 Criminal responsibility of juvenile offenders Albert Drukteinis MD, JD psychiatry journal 6052 Because the juvenile court system has received severe criticism and society has been growing apprehensive about juvenile crime, there is now less tolerance of juvenile offenders and increasing pressure to treat youths as adults. In addition, since the juvenile court system has been strictly mandated by the Supreme Court to observe procedural due process in delinquency hearings, a previously informal atmosphere is gradually being converted to one resembling an adult trial. In this type of forum, mental capacity based on age will likely surface in the more traditional manner seen in adult cases, namely, in issues of competency to stand trial, ability to form criminal intent, and the use of an insanity defense.
1986 Correcting criminal thinking Margaret McGall-Boyes MD psychiatry journal 5225 Author reports outcome of applying principles espoused in Yochelson and Samenow's The Criminal Mind to therapeutic treatment with patients confined at California's Atascadero State Hospital.
1986 Is the issue of competency raised more frequently in crimes of violence? Melvin Heller MD psychiatry journal 5123 no abstract
1986 Confidentiality dilemmas for psychologists and psychiatrists in the criminal justice system George Saxton PhD psychology journal 8125 no abstract
1986 Criminal responsibility of juvenile offenders Albert Drukteinis MD, JD psychology journal 8126 no abstract
1986 Is the issue of competency raised more frequently in crimes of violence? MS Heller MD and WJ Traylor JD psychology journal 8129 no abstract
1986 Correcting criminal thinking Margaret McGall-Boyes MD psychology journal 8130 no abstract
1986 Criminal responsibility of juvenile offenders Albert M Drukteinis MD, JD psychiatry journal 10798 This paper does not attempt to offer a new design for the juvenile court system. Rather it attempts to point out some elements in the evolution of the current methods of dealing with juvenile delinquency, as they relate to past and present concepts of criminal responsibility in children
1985 Mass murder-literature review and conclusions based on studies in criminal psychiatry Arboleda-Florez J psychiatry tapes 10069 Author reviews the literature on mass murderers and presents several conclusions based on his studies in this area of criminal psychiatry.
1985 Assessment of credibility of sexually abused children in criminal court cases Eberhard Mann MD psychiatry journal 5163 Most experts in the field of sexual abuse agree that many families can be reunited if a comprehensive treatment program is available. Guidelines for the psychiatric evaluation of sexually abusive families are offered. The evaluation process is lengthy as it does not merely consist of seeing individual family members. The entire family should be assessed together.
1985 Importance of relating the crime to mental illness in the issue of insanity Robert Howell PhD psychology journal 8118 no abstract
1984 PTSD in criminal defense cases Joel Dreyer, MD
psychiatry tapes 1741 Speaker discusses posttraumatic disorder in terms of its applications to legal defense proceedings, using six legal cases in which he testified as an expert witness.
1983 Psychiatric diagnosis and pattern of drug abuse among violent adolescent criminals Anassero; Daniel MD psychiatry journal 5104 151 severely violent adolescent offenders admitted to a maximum security placement for psychiatric appraisal were studied. Findings support view that violent adolescents are not a homogenous entity diagnostically but evidence multiple disorders. Depression and Substance Abuse disorders should not be underestimated.
1983 Alcoholism and forensic psychiatry - criminal responsibility Eric Fine MD, M.R.C.Psych psychiatry journal 10303 Evaluation of alcoholic litigants is one of the most complicated problems facing the forensic mental health expert. In all legal contexts a crucial issue is whether an individual acts as a legally responsible agent or whether responsibility on a particular occasion was impaired or negated by alcohol dependency, making the act involuntary.
1983 Mentally retarded defendants-competency and criminal responsibility AE Daniel MD
Karl Menninger JD
psychiatry journal 10767 Lack of clear judicial guidelines regarding competency, the clinician's attitudinal bias, and the relatively permanent nature of "retardation " may lead to a finding of incompetency enhancing the chances for permanent confinement of the retarded defendant in a state hospital. Helpful guidelines are presented, which may serve evaluating professionals in making meaningful recommendations to the court. See Competency


1983 Dissociative states-disproportionate use as a defense in criminal proceedings Michael Cleary MD psychiatry journal 6023 no abstract
1983 Profile of the older criminal John LaWall MD psychiatry journal 4136 A significant number of older felons who committed prior felonies suggests that the seriousness of crime does not necessarily decrease with age.
1981 Assessment of credibility of sexually abused children in criminal court cases Eberhard Mann MD psychiatry journal 10308 Most experts in the field of sexual abuse agree that many families can be reunited if a comprehensive treatment program is available. Guidelines for the psychiatric evaluation of sexually abusive families are offered. The evaluation process is lengthy as it does not merely consist of seeing individual family members. The entire family should be assessed together.
1981 Assessment of credibility of sexually abused children in criminal court cases Eberhard Mann MD psychiatry tape 10261 Most experts in the field of sexual abuse agree that many families can be reunited if a comprehensive treatment program is available. Guidelines for the psychiatric evaluation of sexually abusive families are offered. The evaluation process is lengthy as it does not merely consist of seeing individual family members. The entire family should be assessed together.